Eastern Mojave Vegetation Black Canyon Road - Mojave National Preserve  
 

Tom Schweich  

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Literature Cited
 This file describes Black Canyon Road from its north end at Cedar Canyon Road to its south end at Essex Road.

Literature Cited:
- , .

Other articles: Cedar Canyon Road at Black Cyn Rd FAQ Black Canyon  

Junction: Cedar Canyon Road, turn left (west) to descend into Kelso Valley and to Kelso-Cima Road, turn right (east) for Rock Springs and Lanfair Valley.

Other articles: Glossary gneiss Eastern Mojave Geology 300000

Locations: Round Valley.
Full Size ImagePinto Mountain across Round Valley as seen from Black Canyon Road.  

Round Valley

Pinto Mountain across Round Valley as seen from Black Canyon Road. The gray shrubs are Basin Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and the large green shrubs are Utah Juniper (Juniperus osteosperma). Pinto Mountain is composed of Wild Horse Mesa Tuff, Winkler Formation, and Peach Springs Tuff. In the loose rock at the base of Pinto Mountain are boulders of gneiss and schist. That would indicate to me that the basement rock under Pinto Mountain is at or very near the surface.

Literature Cited:
- Ausmus, Bob, 1989.

Other articles: Field Notes Coll. No. 150 20080528010

Locations: Holliman Well.  

Holliman Well.

Don't know how Bob Hollimon became Holliman Well.

Along Black Canyon Road, near Holliman Well, I collected Big Sagebrush, Yellow Rabbitbrush, and Purple Sage.

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Holliman Well
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Coll. No. 150, Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus ssp. viscidiflorus

Other articles: Wild Horse Canyon Road at Black Cyn Rd  

Junction: Wild Horse Canyon Road.

Take this road approximately 3 km southwest to the Mid Hills Campground.

Other articles: Hackberry Complex Fire in Round Valley.
Full Size ImageIntersection of Wild Horse Canyon and Black Canyon Roads after Hackberry Complex Fire.  

This panorama, taken June 27, 2005, after the Hackberry Complex Fire of June 22-25, 2005, shows that much of Round Valley burned as well as a good portion of Pinto Mountain.

Literature Cited:
- Burn Area Emergency Response Team, 2005.  

"The Narrows"

Other articles: Field Notes 20050529110
Full Size ImageRunning water in Black Canyon, looking north.  

Looking north in Black Canyon Road, with running water, on May 29, 2005.

Other articles: Field Notes 20050529120
Full Size ImageInsect larvae in running water, Black Canyon, May 29, 2005  

Insect larvae in running water, May 29, 2005.

Other articles: Field Notes 20050529110
Full Size ImageRunning water in Black Canyon, looking south.  

Looking south in Black Canyon Road, with running water, on May 29, 2005.

Full Size ImageBlack Canyon Road, looking north from near Gold Valley Ranch.  

Black Canyon

View of Black Canyon Road, looking north from the vicinity of Gold Valley Ranch. The low gray shrubs are Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) and the large green shrubs are Utah Juniper (Juniperus osteosperma). This photograph was taken from a location about 50 meters north of the cows as seen in the photograph below. At first glance the vegetation might be classified as "pristine," as indeed much of the Mid Hills vegetation has been characterized. However, on closer examination there are many signs of usage by cattle, and it becomes impossible to know what the native vegetation might have been at this site.

Locations: Gold Valley Ranch.
Full Size ImageCows along Black Canyon Road.  

Gold Valley Ranch

Cows along Black Canyon Road. The original vegetation at this location would have been dominated by Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) which can be seen in the background. However, heavy use by cattle, as they come to this location for water and salt, has completely destroyed the vegetation.

Locations: Table Top.
Full Size ImageTable Top.  

Table Top

The flat-topped mountain to the east of Black Canyon Road is Table Top. Geologic reports note that the Table Top is granite, topped by a quartz latite lava flow. The top surface is flat as it appears to be from the road. For most of its flat top, the vegetation consists of only two species, Basin Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and Utah Juniper (Juniperus osteosperma).

Literature Cited:
- Cook, Ronald U., and Andrew Warren, 1973.
Full Size ImageMoat around rock on Table Top.  

Small moats in the soils around rocks as shown in this photograph are common on Table Top. How the moats form is uncertain. However, it has been found that coarse particles will emerge from desert soils after as few as 4 wetting and drying cycles (Cook and Warren, 1973, p. 128). Once a rock like this emerges at the surface, continued rain runoff from the surface of the rock may wash the very fine particles away from the rock and cause a localized deflation around its edges.

Other articles: Blackbrush in Gold Valley
Full Size ImageBlackbrush Scrub along Black Canyon Road.
Full Size ImageBlackbrush along Black Canyon Road in Gold Valley  

Blackbrush Scrub along Black Canyon Road. This view looks northwest toward Gold Valley Mine and the Little Thorn Mountains. The dark gray shrubs are Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima). This is one location in the Eastern Mojave where Blcakbrush reaches its maximum dominance. Relative density of Blackbrush is about 70% at this location.
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Blackbrush along Black Canyon Road in Gold Valley
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Blackbrush along Black Canyon Road in Gold Valley

Other articles: Gold Valley Mine Road at Black Canyon Road  

Junction: Gold Valley Mine Road, northwest to Gold Valley Mine, and to Lobo Point Road.

Other articles: Routes to Water 230019500  

At some point along Black Canyon Road, near Hole-in-the-Wall, Thompson's (1921) route between Cima and Fenner would coincide with the route of Black Canyon Road.

Other articles: Field Notes 15-Oct-05 at Hole-in-the-Wall

Locations: Woods Mountains.
Full Size ImageMoonrise over the Woods Mountains.  

Moonrise over the Woods Mountains, as seen from the Hole-in-the-Wall campground.
 

Hole-in-the-Wall

 

Locations: Hole-in-the-Wall.
Full Size ImageTwo camp sites in the campground at Hole in the Wall.  

Two camp sites in the campground at Hole-in-the-Wall. While Hole-in-the-Wall is a very pretty area, the camp sites are exposed to wind and sun, except in the late afternoon.

Locations: Hole-in-the-Wall.
Full Size ImageGeneral view of the campground at Hole in the Wall.  

General view of the campground at Hole in the Wall. The slot canyon from which Hole in the Wall got its name is in the center. The peaks of the Providence Mountains can be seen in the distance.

The U. S. G. S. is preparing a bulletin about Hole-in-the-Wall which can be found at: http://geology.wr.usgs.gov/docs/parks/misc/pdfdocs.html#moja

Other articles: Field Notes Coll. No. 2.1 Coll. No. 2.3 Coll. No. 2.4 Coll. No. 3.1 Coll. No. 3.2 Coll. No. 3.3 Coll. No. 3.4 Coll. No. 4.1 Coll. No. 4.2 Coll. No. 4.3 Coll. No. 7.4 Coll. No. 8.1 Coll. No. 8.2 Coll. No. 9.1 Glossary petroglyph

Locations: Woods Mountains.
Full Size ImageColl. No. 8.2, Acmispon rigidus  

Wendy smiles embarrasedly knowing she's gotten into a picture while son copies down petroglyph designs at one of several petroglyph sites in the Woods Mountains.
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Coll. No. 2.1, Amsinckia tessellata var. tessellata
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Coll. No. 2.3, Ambrosia salsola var. salsola
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Coll. No. 2.4, Encelia frutescens
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Coll. No. 3.1, Verbena gooddingii
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Coll. No. 3.3, Malacothrix californica
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Coll. No. 3.4, Phacelia fremontii
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Coll. No. 4.1, Gilia
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Coll. No. 4.2, Encelia virginensis
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Coll. No. 4.3, Physalis crassifolia
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Coll. No. 8.1, Phacelia campanularia var. vasiformis
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Petroglyphs.

Other articles: Wild Horse Canyon Road at Black Cyn Rd  

Junction: Wild Horse Canyon Road, alternate to Black Canyon Road, a little more scenic, and rejoins Black Canyon Road north of Mid Hills Campground.

Full Size ImageVegetation near Hole-in-the-Wall.  
General view of the vegetation approximately 1 km southeast of Hole-in-the-Wall. As you can see, this picture was taken in an unusually green Spring. The cactus in the foreground is Buckhorn Cholla (Opuntia acanthocarpa). The large tree-like plants are Mohave Yucca (Yucca schidigera). The smaller shrubs are boxthorns (Lycium sp.), Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima), and Great Basin Blue Sage (Salvia dorrii).

Locations: Colton Hills.  

Colton Hills, including Colton Well, to the northwest (left).

Other articles: Essex Road at Black Canyon Road  

Junction: Essex Road, right (northwest) for Mitchell Caverns, left (southeast) for US I-40 and Essex.
 

Literature Cited

  A list of all literature cited by this web site can be found in the Bibliography.
  Ausmus, Bob. 1989. East Mojave Diary. Tales of the Mojave Road #16. Norco, California: Tales of the Mojave Road Publishing Company, October 1989. {TAS}
  Burn Area Emergency Response Team. 2005. Burned Area Emergency Stabilization Plan: Hackberry Complex. Primm, Nevada: National-Interagency Burned Area Emergency Response Team, July 5, 2005.
  [Null Author]. . County of San Bernardino vs. U. S. Department of Interior. {TAS-pdf}
  Cook, Ronald U., and Andrew Warren. 1973. Geomorphology in Deserts. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press..
If you have a question or a comment you may write to me at: tas4@schweich.com I sometimes post interesting questions in my FAQ, but I never disclose your full name or address.  


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Date and time this article was prepared: 7/3/2017 1:04:27 PM