Eastern Mojave Vegetation Davis Road  
 

Tom Schweich  

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Literature Cited
 (No Preface)

Other articles: California Highway 111 at Davis Rd  

Junction: California Highway 111

Literature Cited:
- Lynch, David K., Kenneth W. Hudnut, and Paul M. Adams, 2013.
- Schmitt, Axel K., Arturo Martín, Bodo Weber, Daniel F. Stockli, Haibo Zou, and Chuan-Chou Shen, 2013.

Locations: Mullet Island.  

Junction: Alcott Road

Mullet Island directly to the west.

   
  2008 Field Trip Stop 2-10

The crumbling adobe building was part of a factory that extracted carbon dioxide to make dry ice. There are many mud pots within 200 yards of the adobe.

  Junction: Hartz Road
  Junction: McDonald Road

 

 

Literature Cited:
- Reynolds, Robert E., 2008.
- Svensen, Henrik, Dag A. Karlsen, Anne Sturz, Kristian Backer-Owe, David A. Banks and Sverre Planke, 2007.

Other articles: Field Notes 20-Apr-08 20-Apr-08 20-Apr-08 29 Apr 2011  

Mud Volcanoes

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Mud Volcanoes
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Mud Volcanoes
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Mud Volcanoes
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A geothermal plant goes up behind the mud volcanoes.
The mud volcano field is immediately northeast of the junction of Davis Road and Schrimpf Road.

The volcanoes are on private land, pay appropriate respect! Do not drive into the field. CAUTION! Boiling mud and water are hot and soft.

Water-, mud-, gas-, and petroleum-bearing seeps are part of the Salton Sea geothermal system (SSGS) in Southern California. Seeps in the Davis-Schrimpf seep fi eld (~14,000 m2) show considerable variations in water temperature, pH, density, and solute content. Water-rich springs have low densities (<1.4 g/cm3), Cl contents as high as 45,000 ppm, and temperatures between 15 and 34 °C. Gryphons expel denser water-mud mixtures (to 1.7 g/cm3), have low salinities (3600–5200 ppm Cl), and have temperatures between 23 and 63 °C. The main driver for the seep system is CO2 (>98 vol%). Halogen geochemistry of the waters indicates that mixing of deep and shallow waters occurs and that near-surface dissolution of halite may overprint the original fl uid compositions. Carbon isotopic analyses suggest that hydrocarbon seep gases have a thermogenic origin. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of petroleum in a water-dominated spring, composed of 53% saturated compounds, 35% aromatics, and 12% polar compounds. The abundance of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and immature biomarkers suggests a hydrothermal formation of the petroleum, making the SSGS a relevant analogue to less accessible hydrothermal seep systems, e.g., the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California (Authors' Abstract).

Other articles: Schrimpf Road at Davis Rd  

Junction: Schrimpf Road, turn west to Garst Road, or east to English Road, and CA Highway 111.
  South end of Davis Road. Davis Road does not continue south of Schrimpf Road.

 

 

   

Literature Cited

  A list of all literature cited by this web site can be found in the Bibliography.
  Lynch, David K., Kenneth W. Hudnut, and Paul M. Adams. 2013. Development and growth of recently-exposed fumarole fields near Mullet Island, Imperial County, California. Geomorphology. 195: 27-44. {TAS-pdf}
  Reynolds, Robert E. 2008. Trough to Trough -- The Field Trip Guide. Proceedings of the 2008 Desert Symposium. April 2008. {TAS}
  Schmitt, Axel K., Arturo Martín, Bodo Weber, Daniel F. Stockli, Haibo Zou, and Chuan-Chou Shen. 2013. Oceanic magmatism in sedimentary basins of the northern Gulf of California rift. GSA Bulletin. 125(11/12):1833-1850. {TAS-pdf}
  Svensen, Henrik, Dag A. Karlsen, Anne Sturz, Kristian Backer-Owe, David A. Banks and Sverre Planke. 2007. Processes controlling water and hydrocarbon composition in seeps from the Salton Sea geothermal system, California, USA. Geology. 35(1):85-88. {TAS-pdf}
If you have a question or a comment you may write to me at: tas4@schweich.com I sometimes post interesting questions in my FAQ, but I never disclose your full name or address.  


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Date and time this article was prepared: 12/12/2017 5:47:15 PM