Eastern Mojave Vegetation A Bibliography on Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima)  
 

Tom Schweich  

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Topics in this Article:
Introduction
Literature Review
Field Work and Methods
Taxonomy, Distribution and Growth Habits
Anatomy and Physiology
Relationships to Soils and Other Plants
Life History
Succession
Insects, Diseases, and Other Pests
Discussion
Summary
Literature Cited
 (No Preface)

Literature Cited:
- Anonymous, n.d..
- Beatley, J. C., 1974.
- Beatley, Janice C., 1975.
- Beatley, J. C., 1976.
- Bowns, J. E., 1973.
- Bowns, James. E. and Neil E. West, 1975.
- Bowns, J. E., and N. E. West, 1976.
- Callison, Jim, Jack D. Brotherson, and James E. Bowns, 1985.
- Callison, James, and Jack D. Brotherson., 1985.
- Hunter, K. L., and J. R.McAuliffe, 1994.
- Kituku, V. M., W. A. Laycock, J. Powell, and A. A. Beetle, 1996.
- Koehler, P. A., and R. S. Anderson, 1995.
- Korthuis, S. L., 1988.
- Lei, S. A., 1995.
- Lei, S. A., 1996a.
- Lei, S. A., 1996b.
- Lei, S. A., 1997.
- Lei, S. A. and L. R. Walker, 1994.
- Lei, S. A., and L. R. Walker, 1995.
- Lei, S. A., and L. R. Walker, 1995.
- Lei, S A and L. R. Walker, 1997a.
- Lei, S. A., and L. R. Walker, 1997b.
- Lin, G., S. L. Phillips, and J. R. Ehleringer, J R., 1993.
- Lin, G., S. L. Phillips, and J. R. Ehleringer, J R., 1996.
- Meyer, S. E., and B. K. Pendelton, 1994.
- Ortega-Reyes, L., and F. D. Provenza, 1993a.
- Ortega-Reyes, L., and F. D. Provenza, 1993b.
- Pendleton, B. K., and S. E. Meyer, 1994.
- Pendleton, Burton K., Susan E. Meyer, and Rosemary L. Pendleton, 1996.
- Pendleton, B. K., and R. L. Pendleton, 1996.
- Provenza, F. D., 1978.
- Provenza, Frederick D., et al., 1983.
- Provenza, F. D., J. J, Lynch, E. A. Burritt, and C. B. Scott, 1994.
- Sampson, Arthur W., and Beryl A. Jespersen, 1963.
- Sandquist, D. R., W. S. F. Schuster, L. A. Donovan, S. L. Phillips, and J. R. Ehleringer, J R., 1993.
- Schuster, W. S. F., D. R. Sandquist, S. L. Phillips, and J. R. Ehleringer, 1994.
- Smith, S. D., C. A. Herr, K. L. Leary, J. M. Piorkowski, 1995.  

Introduction

 
 

Literature Review

 
 

Field Work and Methods

 
 

Results

 
 

Taxonomy, Distribution and Growth Habits

 
 

Taxonomy

 
 

Distribution

Details about the distribution of Blackbrush can be found in "Distribution of Blackbrush."

Literature Cited:
- DeDecker, Mary, 1984.  

In the northern Mojave Desert, the species is widespread between 3,600 and 6,000 feet elevation, and often dominant in almost pure stands (DeDecker, 1984)
 

California

 

Other articles: Glacier Lodge Road at powerline
Full Size ImageBlackbrush near Big Pine
Full Size ImageBlackbrush near Big Pine  

Near Big Pine, California
Full Size Image
Blackbrush near Big Pine

Other articles: Casa Diablo Mine Road on the road
Full Size ImageBlackbrush on the Volcanic Tableland
Full Size ImageBlackbrush on the Volcanic Tableland  

On the Volcanic Tableland, north of Bishop, California

Other articles: Kessler Springs Road near pass
Full Size ImageBlackbrush in pass between Cima Dome and Kessler Peak  

In the pass between Cima Dome and Kessler Peak.

Other articles: Black Canyon Road in Gold Valley
Full Size ImageBlackbrush along Black Canyon Road in Gold Valley
Full Size ImageBlackbrush along Black Canyon Road in Gold Valley  

 
Full Size Image
Blackbrush along Black Canyon Road in Gold Valley
 

Colorado

 
 

Nevada

 

Other articles: Field Notes 20090603050 Nays Ranch Road near Whitney Pass
Full Size ImageBlackbrush near Whitney Pass  

Near Whitney Pass on the south side of the Virgin Mountains.
 

Utah

 
 

Growth Habits

 

Locations: Apex Mine.
Full Size ImagePure stand of Blackbrush in Beaverdam Mountains, Utah.  

 
 

Anatomy and Physiology

 
 

Roots and Other Belowground Parts

 
 

Stems

 
 

Leaves

 
 

Flowers

 
 

Relationships to Soils and Other Plants

 
 

Relation to Soils

 
 

Plant Associates

 
 

Allelopathy

 
 

Competition

 
 

Life History

 
 

Germination

 
 

Seedling Establishment

 
 

Early Growth Stage

 
 

Establishment

 
 

Dormancy

 
 

Flowering

 

Literature Cited:
- Pendleton, Burton K., and Rosemary L. Pendleton., 1998.

Other articles: Glossary anemophilous Interstate 15 Exit 27  

A study by Pendleton and Pendleton (1998) shows Blackbrush to be wind-pollinated (anemophilous). They studied pollination ecology of the species at three different locations 1) Arches National Park, 2) Toquerville exit (exit 27) W of Interstate 13, and 3) Beaver Dam slope, 1.9 km W of U. S. Hwy. 91. The four treatments applied were 1) self pollination using paper bags to exclude both wind and animal pollinators, 2) wind pollination using 1-mm mesh bridal veil netting, 3) open pollination, and 4) controlled cross pollination within paper bags.
  In no instance did exclusion of animal and insect pollinators result in fruit set, indicating that blackbrush is wind pollinated.
  Fruit set on self-pollinated branches was substantially reduced in all three populations, demonstrating that blackbrush is essentially self-incompatible.

Other articles: Glossary entemophily
Full Size ImagePure stand of Blackbrush in Beaverdam Mountains, Utah.  

Since the ancestral pollination system in Rosaceae is entemophily, Blackbrush would have switched to wind pollination from insect pollination. This shift is most likely to occur in species that occupy open and often arid habitats where pollen movement is not restricted by close proximity of other species or frequent rain. Another requirement for effective pollination is juxtaposition of a sufficient number of individuals such as occurs in monospecific stands. Such a shift would not be unexpected in blackbrush, which often occurs as a near monoculture in such open arid habitats.
 

Seed

 
 

Collecting Seed

 
 

Vegetation Reproduction

 
 

Life Span

 

Other articles: FAQ HC303701  

 
 

Succession

 
 

Grazing Effects

 
 

Insects, Diseases, and Other Pests

 
 

Discussion

 
 

Adaptation

 
 

The Species In An Ecosystem

 
 

Summary

 
 

Literature Cited

  A list of all literature cited by this web site can be found in the Bibliography.
  Anonymous. n.d.. Provisional Vascular Plant List for Arches National Park. ftp://ice.ucdavis.edu/pub/NPS/Arches_National_Park/species_lists/archflor.txt
  Anonymous. n.d.. Provisional Vascular Plant List for Arches National Park. ftp://ice.ucdavis.edu/pub/NPS/Arches_National_Park/species_lists/archflor.txt
  Beatley, J. C. 1974. Phenological events and their environmental triggers in Mojave Desert ecosystems. Ecology. 55: 856-863.
  Beatley, Janice C. 1975. Climates and vegetation pattern across the Mojave / Great Basin desert transition of southern Nevada. American Midland Naturalist. 93(1):53-70. {TAS}
  Beatley, J. C. 1976. Vascular plants of the Nevada Test Site and central-southern Nevada: ecological and geographical distributions. Springfield, VA: National Technical Information Service. U. S. Department of Commerce.
  Bowns, J. E. 1973. An autecological study of blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima Torr.) in southwestern Utah. Unpublished dissertation. Utah State Univeristy, Logan..
  Bowns, James. E. and Neil E. West. 1975. Wildland Shrubs: Proceedings of Symposium and Workshop at the Dedication of The U. S. Forest Service Shrub Sciences Laboratory, Provo, Utah. Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima Torr.), an important but little known major vegetation type. UCB Biosci: QK481.S82
  Bowns, J. E., and N. E. West. 1976. Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima Torr.) in southwestern Utah rangelands. Utah Agricultural Experiment Station Research Report 27.
  Callison, Jim, Jack D. Brotherson, and James E. Bowns. 1985. The effects of fire on the blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) community of southwestern Utah. Journal of Range Management. 38(6):535-538.
  Callison, James, and Jack D. Brotherson. 1985. Habitat relationships of the Blackbrush community (Coleogyne ramosissima) of southwestern Utah. Great Basin Naturalist. 45(2):321-326.
  DeDecker, Mary. 1984. Flora of the northern Mojave Desert, California. Berkeley, CA: Califonia Native Plant Society.. {TAS}
  Hunter, K. L., and J. R.McAuliffe. 1994. Elevational shifts of Coleogyne ramosissima in the Mojave Desert during the Little Ice Age. Quaternary Research (Orlando). 42(2):216-221.
  Kituku, V. M., W. A. Laycock, J. Powell, and A. A. Beetle. 1996. Propagating bitterbrush twigs for restoring shrublands. pp. 327-328 in Roundy, Bruce A., E. Durant McArthur, Jennifer S. Haley, David K. Mann. Proceedings: wildland shrub and arid land restoration symposium. October 19-21, 1993. Las Vegas, NV. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-315. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 384 p.
  Koehler, P. A., and R. S. Anderson. 1995. Thirty thousand years of vegetation changes in the Alabama Hills, Owens Valley, California. Quaternary Research (Orlando). 43(2):238-248. {TAS-PDF}
  Korthuis, S. L. 1988. Coleogyne ramosissima. pp. in William C. Fischer, compiler. The fire effects information system (database). Missoula, MT: U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, Fire Science Laboratory. Magnetic tape reels; 9 track; 1600 bpi, ASCII with Common LISP present.
  Lei, S. A. 1995. A gradient analysis of Coleogyne communities in southern Nevada. Unpublished master's thesis. University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
  Lei, S. A. 1996a. A gradient analysis of the Mojave Desert woody vegetation in a southern Nevada mountain range. American Journal of Botany. 83(6 SUPPL):84.
  Lei, S. A. 1996b. Environmental constraints on the distribution of Coleogyne shrublands in southern Nevada. American Journal of Botany. 83(6 SUPPL):84.
  Lei, S. A. 1997. Variation in germination response to temperature and water availability in blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) and its ecological significance. Great Basin Naturalist. 57(2):172-177.
  Lei, S. A. and L. R. Walker. 1994. Environmental factors influencing the distribution of Coleogyne communities in southern Nevada. Bulletin Of The Ecological Society Of America. 75(2 Part 2):130.
  Lei, S. A., and L. R. Walker. 1995. Classification and ordination of Coleogyne communities in southern Nevada. Bulletin of the Ecological Society Of America. 76(2 Suppl Pt 2):158.
  Lei, S. A., and L. R. Walker. 1995. Composition and distribution of blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) communities in southern Nevada. pp. 192-195 in Roundy, Bruce A., E. Durant McArthur, Jennifer S. Haley, David K. Mann, compilers. Proceedings: wildland shrub and arid land restoration symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-315. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 384 p. October 19-21, 1993. Las Vegas, NV
  Lei, S A and L. R. Walker. 1997a. Classification and ordination of Coleogyne communities in southern Nevada. Great Basin Naturalist. 57(2):155-162.
  Lei, S. A., and L. R. Walker. 1997b. Biotic and abiotic factors influencing the distribution of Coleogyne communities in southern Nevada. Great Basin Naturalist. 57(2):163-171.
  Lin, G., S. L. Phillips, and J. R. Ehleringer, J R. 1993. Specific Variation in Short-Term Responses of Water Relations To Summer Rain Increase Among Five Desert Shrub Species of Southern Utah. Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America. 74(2 Suppl.):331-332.
  Lin, G., S. L. Phillips, and J. R. Ehleringer, J R. 1996. Monsoonal precipitation responses of shrubs in a cold desert community on the Colorado Plateau. Oecologia (Berlin). 106(1):8-17.
  Meyer, S. E., and B. K. Pendelton. 1994. Factors affecting seedling recruitment success in blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima). Bulletin of the Ecological Society Of America. 75(2 Part 2):153.
  Ortega-Reyes, L., and F. D. Provenza. 1993a. Amount of Experience and Age Affect the Development of Foraging Skills of Goats Browsing Blackbrush Coleogyne-Ramosissima. Applied Animal Behaviour Science. 36((2-3)):169-183.
  Ortega-Reyes, L., and F. D. Provenza. 1993b. Experience with Blackbrush Affects Ingestion of Shrub Live Oak by Goats. Journal of Animal Science. 71(2):380-383.
  Pendleton, B. K., and S. E. Meyer. 1994. Germination biology of Coleogyne ramosissima (Rosaceae). I. Laboratory studies. Unpublished manuscript on file at Shrub Sciences Laboratory, 735 North 500 East, Provo, UT 84606.
  Pendleton, Burton K., Susan E. Meyer, and Rosemary L. Pendleton. 1996. Blackbrush biology: insights after three years of a long-term study. pp. 223-227 in Roundy, Bruce A., E. Durant McArthur, Jennifer S. Haley, David K. Mann, compilers. Proceedings: wildland shrub and arid land restoration symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-315. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 384 p. October 19-21, 1993. Las Vegas, NV
  Pendleton, Burton K., and Rosemary L. Pendleton. 1998. Pollination biology of Coleogyne ramosissima (Rosaceae). The Southwestern Naturalist. 43(3):376-380. {TAS}
  Pendleton, B. K., and R. L. Pendleton. 1996. Pollination biology of Coleogyne ramosissima (Rosaceae). American Journal of Botany. 83(6 Suppl.):86. {TAS}
  Provenza, F. D. 1978. Getting the most out of blackbrush. Utah Science. 39: 144-146.
  Provenza, Frederick D., et al. 1983. Some factors affecting twig growth in blackbrush. Journal of Range Management. 36(4):518-520.
  Provenza, F. D., J. J, Lynch, E. A. Burritt, and C. B. Scott. 1994. How goats learn to distinguish between novel foods that differ in postingestive consequences. Journal of Chemical Ecology. 20(3):609-624.
  Sampson, Arthur W., and Beryl A. Jespersen. 1963. California Range Brushlands and Browse Plants. 1963. {TAS}
  Sandquist, D. R., W. S. F. Schuster, L. A. Donovan, S. L. Phillips, and J. R. Ehleringer, J R. 1993. Differences in Carbon Isotope Discrimination Between Seedlings and Adults of Southwestern Desert Perennial Plants. Southwestern Naturalist. 38(3):212-217.
  Schuster, W. S. F., D. R. Sandquist, S. L. Phillips, and J. R. Ehleringer. 1994. High levels of genetic variation in populations of four dominant arid land plant species in Arizona. Journal Of Arid Environments. 27(2):159-167.
  Smith, S. D., C. A. Herr, K. L. Leary, J. M. Piorkowski. 1995. Soil-plant water relations in a Mojave Desert mixed shrub community: A comparison of three geomorphic surfaces. Journal of Arid Environments. 29(3):339-351.
 
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Date and time this article was prepared: 4/9/2017 9:08:06 AM